Is it Graham Greene’s use of similes that creates the cinematic quality in his books?

I’m listening again to the first Graham Greene novel I read or listened to, Brighton Rock. There is something about Greene’s writing that I find incredibly attractive. Throw in his little morsels of philosophy and religion, which are ever present in all of this books, and they have a depth beyond the usual spy or… Continue reading Is it Graham Greene’s use of similes that creates the cinematic quality in his books?

What I’m reading at the moment

At any given time, I am reading two books: one audiobook and one which I read on my Kindle. I am trying, for the second time, a book which is regarded as a true classic: “One Hundred Years of Solitude”, by Colombian author, Gabriel Garcia Marquez. As I say, this is my second time around… Continue reading What I’m reading at the moment

“Travels with my aunt”, by Graham Greene

I am listening to “Travels with my aunt” by Graham Greene at the moment and I would recommend it highly. It is beautifully written in the unique Graham Greene style and is tremendously entertaining, and uproariously funny in places. The narration by Tim Pigott-Smith adds greatly to the enjoyment as he is superb at the… Continue reading “Travels with my aunt”, by Graham Greene

What I am reading at the moment

I am reading ‘Resurrection’ by Leo Tolstoy and listening to ‘The Power and the Glory’ by Graham Greene at the moment. ‘Resurrection’ is Tolstoy’s last long novel and is supposed to be a panoramic look at Russia at the end of the 19th century. The book’s main character is a well to do, wealthy Prince… Continue reading What I am reading at the moment

Graham Greene’s ‘The Quiet American’-spare, economic writing and deep cynicism

I’m listening to Graham Greene’s ‘The Quiet American’ at the moment. It is only a short book-less than ten hours I think-but it packs a lot in with a spare, economic, clipped style of writing. I have read ‘Brighton Rock’ and ‘The End of the Affair’ and Greene appears to have a particular, unique style.… Continue reading Graham Greene’s ‘The Quiet American’-spare, economic writing and deep cynicism

An overlooked and undervalued benefit of reading old books

One of the pleasures of reading books that are described as ‘classic’ is the reintroduction of words that have fallen out of common, everyday use. I am reading “The End of the Affair” by Graham Greene at the moment and the writing is beautiful in a particularly British voice. Little words like ‘odd’ and ‘queer’… Continue reading An overlooked and undervalued benefit of reading old books